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The Worlds 1st low-cost Print & Cut desktop machine!

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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:19 am

The Worlds 1st low-cost Print & Cut desktop machine!

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Roland DG (UK) has announced the arrival of its VersaSTUDIO BN-20 print and cut solution which sits on a desktop yet offers many of the proven benefits of the company’s renowned VersaCAMM VS series. This new and innovative system brings durable Eco-Sol Max inks, a versatile metallic option and integrated precision contour cutting to a compact and affordable solution which is easy and profitable to use.

“This is the very first low-cost print and cut desktop machine in the world, and its inclusion of metallic ink brings all the advantages formerly only found in a wide-format system within reach of everyone who wants to create and produce innovative output,” states Adam Wyles, Business Manager – Promo, Screen and Textile at Roland DG. “Competitively priced, very low running costs and simplicity of operation are certain to make the VersaSTUDIO BN-20 an instant best-seller across the board. Anyone can use it – it really is that simple to design and generate high quality professional results that easily match the results from far more expensive platforms.”

With a maximum print width of 20 inches (51cm), the RolandVersaSTUDIO BN-20 is a rugged plug-and-play solution that produces very high quality output with smooth graduated tints and strong, dense solid colours, making it ideal for photographic and vector output. Available in two options of four-colour and CMYK plus metallic ink, users can generate graphic output onto a vast range of coated and uncoated materials, with precision contour cutting making it ideal for the production of labels, stickers and other applications where complex designs and shapes are required.

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Roland’s renowned Eco-Sol Max inks feature fast drying of output with a wide colour gamut and tough scratch and scuff resistance. Low costs per square metre are complemented by odourless prints and a three-year outdoor life without lamination, and the BN-20 can be operated in any commercial, retail small office or home office environment. The addition of metallic inks to the CMYK ink set means that value-added applications can be produced quickly and easily direct to a wide range of materials. Pearlescent and metallic colours can be produced via Roland’s VersaWorks print production software which incorporates the ability to reproduce more than 1,000 standard shades and 512 metallic options.

Plug-and-play connectivity makes it simple for both novice and experienced users alike to benefit from the high quality output produced by the VersaSTUDIO BN-20. Its long-life inks and fine results, plus its metallic options and integrated precision cutting, combine to open the doors to a vast number of users who, until now, haven’t been able to justify the purchase of an advanced inkjet printer.

The extremely low investment point and tough construction also make the VersaSTUDIO BN-20 an invaluable workhorse for businesses who want to reap the benefits of producing smaller format applications. By adding this compact system to existing print shops, production from their larger inkjet units doesn’t have to be disrupted, resulting in greater efficiencies and optimised printing schedules.

Despite its low purchase price, Roland’s VersaSTUDIO BN-20 benefits from the features found in the VersaCAMM VS series, including the company’s award-winning Eco-Sol Max inks which offer up to three-year outdoor durability, fast drying times and a very broad colour gamut.

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The addition of metallic effects and finishes matches those which formerly could only be achieved via hot foil blocking, screen-printing or offset litho production. Lengthy make-ready and cost penalties incurred when setting up special colours is eradicated as the BN-20 can print one-offs and short runs just as quickly and efficiently as personalised multiples and repeat batches.

Included with the VersaSTUDIO BN-20 is Roland R-Works design software which creates photographic and vector-based jobs quickly and easily for perfect output every time. Roland’s VersaWorks professional print management software also enables users to benefit from variable data printing for customised production which is ideal for labels, invitations, name cards, badges and other items where individual data is required.

Brett Newman, Technical Director of Roland DG (UK), comments: “Market trends show us that there is a new level of end user that wants the convenience of being able to produce high quality, full-colour jobs and metallic finishes in-house. These people, and others, have simply been waiting for the right technology to become available and we’ve developed the VersaSTUDIO BN-20 to address the growing demand for bringing the benefits of wide format technology to the desktop.”

The Roland VersaSTUDIO BN-20 is a true plug-and-play solution that enables users to be up and running immediately, producing a vast range of colour and metallic effect products. Typical applications include labels, decals, heat transfers, promotional signs and displays, point-of-sale and fine art, although the final output is limited only by the imagination of the user.

For further information:
http://www.rolanddg.co.uk/
0845 230 90 60.

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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:00 pm

I quite like the look of this, a print and cut small enough to fit in my workshop!! I sub out all my large format but this could be useful for a number of smaller jobs which are perhaps not economical to sub out, I can see it fitting in nicely but...

I can not find machine and consumable costs on the roland website - I know I could phone them or email them but I don't really wanna get caught up in a sales pitch at this moment.

are any of our usual suppliers selling it?

who will supply cut to size media?

Hugh "off for a more in-depth investigation as we speak!"
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:12 pm

its on graphy website so i see...
but no prices listed anywhere online in uk
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:37 pm

Gave them a phone and someone is going to get back to me.

James
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:54 pm

they were released here on Wednesday. I think they are about $US7000.00

They are just a modern take on the PC60/50

Great little unit, I can see earning a quid for the dedicated sign shop just got harder though. A lot of entry level users about to undercut prices me thinks....
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:09 pm

Shane Drew wrote:they were released here on Wednesday. I think they are about $US7000.00

They are just a modern take on the PC60/50

Great little unit, I can see earning a quid for the dedicated sign shop just got harder though. A lot of entry level users about to undercut prices me thinks....


I can see it being perfect for me in a number of ways, not just financially but, I can see the issue with the back room ebay generation undercutting everyone, but they're doing that anyways I guess.

for me it's more about being able to offer small runs that I wouldn't bother putting to a subby due to either small qty or time issue -even though my printer is super fast. it just allows me to do a bit more in house than before and, to also expand on things I already do but, with considerably less messing about.

the main thing though, with a little re-organisation ( a long overdue clear-out,) it'll fit in my little workshop.

I am curious though, does it use regular size carts or, inflated price 'small' carts specially for that machine, thus limiting what's available for it.
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:14 pm

I would guess it takes the same carts as I doubt they will bother to make new ones with the same ink in. You will have the choice of 220 or 440. It will be 220 that is shown in the image so you would need the extra space for bigget carts sticking out
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:18 pm

Gavin MacMillan wrote:I would guess it takes the same carts as I doubt they will bother to make new ones with the same ink in. You will have the choice of 220 or 440. It will be 220 that is shown in the image so you would need the extra space for bigget carts sticking out


thanks Gavin,
i'm not hugely familiar any of the printers so wasn't aware.

cheers,
HUgh
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:38 pm

i was very interested until i saw no white ink and 500mm material..
because of the metallic i was expecting white as well. and expecting it to take 600mm material.

hugh 400 m carts are 300mm longer and the 220 carts stick out half way already.
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:08 pm

Looks like a great little unit, but as Chris says, no white ink, and would have to stock yet another size vinyl! Still interesting though.

If anyone gets to know the price, I'd be interested to hear it!!!

Lorraine :lol1:
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:45 pm

This was shown first at Sign UK.....retail cost is £4995.00

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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 5:25 pm

I like the look of these too, I can't help but think a 2nd user SP or SV 300 might be more versatile though.
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 8:54 pm

I cant speak for Roland/Solvent white ink, in other printers white ink can be troublesome so glad not to see it.

This as a £5K proofer / printer, that could be interesting idea.
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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:05 pm

looks like a good deal. it is relatively slow, but a starting point for smaller sign business's
My only concern, as this type of kit becomes cheaper, more and more medium size companies may consider doing their own stickers in house,

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Post Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:48 pm

Peter Normington wrote:My only concern, as this type of kit becomes cheaper, more and more medium size companies may consider doing their own stickers in house



it's no cheaper than the print & cut PC600 or PC60 when it came out, and it was 24inch wide...

you also have to have an operator, designer, applicator and so on.
not difficult to pull together and wing your way thru, i agree, but lets face it... companies that will go this route are the same ones calling round us all, handing "our layouts" here and there for a better price.
whatever they do finally create themselves will look crap, inconsistent and badly fitted. if nothing else, they make us lot look good! :wink:
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:39 am

its a price of a very small car but with a warranty!
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 11:16 am

Robert Lambie wrote:
Peter Normington wrote:My only concern, as this type of kit becomes cheaper, more and more medium size companies may consider doing their own stickers in house



it's no cheaper than the print & cut PC600 or PC60 when it came out, and it was 24inch wide...

you also have to have an operator, designer, applicator and so on.
not difficult to pull together and wing your way thru, i agree, but lets face it... companies that will go this route are the same ones calling round us all, handing "our layouts" here and there for a better price.
whatever they do finally create themselves will look crap, inconsistent and badly fitted. if nothing else, they make us lot look good! :wink:


I may be wrong but seem to remember pc60 600 were about 5 k when they came out. so allowing for inflation the new roland is far cheaper in relative terms?

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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:14 pm

Peter Normington wrote:I may be wrong but seem to remember pc60 600 were about 5 k when they came out. so allowing for inflation the new roland is far cheaper in relative terms?

Peter


yes, but the return on digital prints back then was much higher then too...
I had the first PC60 in the UK. we would charge £20-25 for an A4 printed onto vinyl.
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 3:14 pm

LOL, I also had one of those PC60 jobbies waaay back. That thing almost put me off from buying another Roland! Broken ribbons, huge operating cost.....

This new printer would probably find its way into my shop. I just love new toys!

I have both an SP540 and RS 640, but they are very busy. Sometimes jobs can take a day to get onto a machine. Print and cut can sometimes be backlogged for 2 days. Normally not a problem, bit this little bugger will be great for doing those small jobs ( 1 set door stickers etc) Also, when colour matching is done while the machines are running is a big problem for us. This printer can do that as well. And I can add metallic - namebadges, bike stickers etc... I also do a lot of "back to original" graphics for panelbeaters. This will be great for that as well.....

All in all, a very useful machine as an add-on, or for somebody like Hough. Pity its not 24inch......
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:31 pm

I maybe talking nonsense here, pure guess work on my part. but it would make good business sense to sell a great new machine to our industry "with an odd width" of media. then get the after sales on the ink as well as introduce a Roland media...

Machine sales
Ink
Media
maintenance contracts

I am just guessing of course due to the odd width, but why not?
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:40 pm

Maybe, but some suppliers will slit it down to the width that you want. In all honesty I can see this going the same way as the Edge. Small machine that will die out in a couple of years. Wonder how long before they're all on ebay.
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:02 pm

Karl the edge dominated the market for many years world wide mate.

If you have a good reputable supplier with good prices. you buy a machine from them and open an account, you need to buy inks, so you lift phone and call, same thing "2 ink carts please and stick a roll of vinyl on the order too"... that sorta thing.
your machine breaks down, you call the same people. i think it does work well because you build up a relationship with the sales team. easier to negotiate better prices and they have full history and knowledge on your required products.
as long as the likes of Roland did this at a competitive rate i think its a pretty much a win win situation all round. if they don't, they obviously leave the door wide open for their captive audience to source inks, media, maintenance contracts etc elsewhere.
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Post Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:25 pm

i wonder what print head... a dx5 epson i wonder? that i like to know
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Post Sat Jun 11, 2011 1:28 am

I agree rob, the narrow width is sheer stupidity. If you are going to make a machine from scratch, why a size that is not even half the width of a standard 1370mm print roll. Even cast computer cut material which I print on in an emergency no longer is supported in anything less than 610mm here. Typical Roland though. I doubt they consulted the industry in the making of the unit, they are so keen on being the first in anything they sometimes forget the obvious. I'm sure V2 will be wider.
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Post Sat Jun 11, 2011 10:31 am

I would have thought that if it was wider then it would impact on the sales of their VP/SP300's which are significantly more expensive.

To stock roll widths of white vinyl at 500mm is not a problem, lets be fair it won't break the bank. The major concern is that they have now opened up the market to almost everyone who thinks they are a signwriter/maker/designer.

I think this is very short sighted as third party inks will be installed so they will not see the revenue there, vinyl can be bought anywhere and in all honesty it's a pretty disposable piece of kit so why bother with maintenance contracts.

Easy to use so unlike the P60 and Edge you don't really need to think about the way you design and print and cut.

I'd buy one as fourth desktop machine to churn out labels all day long but so will everyone else.

Yet even more competition in our market. :(
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Post Sat Jun 11, 2011 10:41 am

Maybe, but some suppliers will slit it down to the width that you want. In all honesty I can see this going the same way as the Edge. Small machine that will die out in a couple of years. Wonder how long before they're all on ebay.



I don't agree that they will die out like the Edge / PC60 as they are far easier to use and should be outputting much higher quality print.
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Post Sat Jun 11, 2011 11:57 am

Peter Normington wrote:looks like a good deal. it is relatively slow, but a starting point for smaller sign business's
My only concern, as this type of kit becomes cheaper, more and more medium size companies may consider doing their own stickers in house,

Peter


A nice printer, but got to agree with Peter and Jason, it opens up more people doing printing in house, or more people starting up, pushing the prices down further for printing etc.

But don`t forget, just like most printers, the manufacturers make their money from the consumables too, Inks, parts, substrates. 50cm does seem an odd size, so perhaps it will only print onto certain vinyl and can only use certain inks.

We had a P600 and I think it cost £5500 approx 10 years ago
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Post Sat Jun 11, 2011 12:08 pm

Peter Normington wrote:I may be wrong but seem to remember pc60 600 were about 5 k when they came out. so allowing for inflation the new roland is far cheaper in relative terms?

Peter


I think it was £6,495 rrp. So a fair bit more.
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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:07 am

the more i think of it, the more I think it would benefit from having the capability to print white, i've turned down three very small print jobs that involved white on clear this week, the kind of jobs that wouldv'e been ideal for this machine.

I get a lot of small order / small run stuff requested but it's just not that economical to mess about with most of the time, while i'm happpy with my trade printer, this would be great for small runs. though for £5k, could I get a good used machine which also prints white in the near future?
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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:17 am

Hugh I dont think it does white, just metalics,
Chris Wool mentioned it earlier.

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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 9:29 am

Rob,
I was referring to the size mate. Yes the edge was a great machine. When they first came out everyone including me was amazed by what it could do.
But it's the size that's the problem. That's why I think it's popularity may be short lived.
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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 10:14 am

The edge and other thermal printers died because the cost of printing is about 5-10x inkjet.
This machine is not really a general signmakers tool , it is expensive for what it is , its main attraction is the metallic ink.

I would buy one in addition to my 540 as it means I can offer more products for my badge and doming line. To whit , metallics in ANY colour and more importantly , the ability to offer metallic/pearlescent and metallic texturised printing on dark substrates. I wouldnt worry about the width issue as my suppliers and most others will slit to size.(for a price)
Its also not an issue to make a simple slitting machine.

The other plus for me is the ability to print on 1mm thick media , even if I cant cut some of that thickness on the machine , I can do so on my lasers.

This machine IS no where near a production machine , I have
seen one in operation and its slowwwww.... especially when doing metallics!!!!

I doubt anyone will undercut pricing any more than folk are doing now , the inks are all the same price , the media will proabably be more and its only the capital amount that differs from the big machines. Best it can do is an A2 anyway....and will take a looong time to do so in anything other than draft mode
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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:27 am

anyone know if its a DX5 print head? and how many?
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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:45 am

The VS range use dx6 heads Dave, imagine this one will as well.

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Post Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:53 am

I didn't even know about the DX6, I am just reading it had more channels than the DX5, 9 x360 nozzles? is that right? hard to find right info on it
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Post Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:09 pm

Peter Normington wrote:Hugh I dont think it does white, just metalics,
Chris Wool mentioned it earlier.

Peter


HI Peter,

yes, I realised that, I was trying to say that a lot of my smaller jobs that i've turned down in the past have involved the need to print onto clear, making white a necessity, thus rendering this machine of less value to me than i first thought,

cheers,
Hugh
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Post Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:25 pm

this machine although running the same inks as the rest of the Roland sign range are not aimed 100 percent at sign makers. I had a long chat with Brett Newman at the sign show over the entire new range of printers & this one although capable of signage work is aimed at the apparel market hence he width being the same as most T-shirt media.

Kev
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Post Thu Jun 23, 2011 10:38 pm

that makes sense Kev,

cheers,
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Post Sat Jun 25, 2011 5:55 pm

I've only just found this thread and, as a Gerber Edge FX owner, found it very interesting. I do quite a lot of small labels and my Edge has more than paid for itself.

What appeals to me about this printer is it's simplicity in use compared to the Edge with its foils and quirky Omega software. I do think the range and quality of the metallics available on the Edge will be better in appearance on the finished product. I base this on samples sent to me from another (maybe Roland) metallic capable printer - I was underwhelmed.

It would be great if it had white ink BUT, developments in white ink have been quite slow and the hardware still requires a high degree of maintenance to keep the white moving. To many potential problems possibly.

In it's favour, I think the Gerber is faster with metallics, better with metallics and offers a great white backing. You don't require a laminator either.
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Post Sat Jun 25, 2011 11:30 pm

John
i have had a VS640 with metallic & white on trial for 6 months & have to say that maintenance as been minimal. The new recirculation system works well & has been modified via firmware updates & it looks after itself

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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:23 am

I have an XC540 with white ink. No re circulation system and I am not sure where people get their information on the maintenance for white ink machines. Most of the comments seem like no one does maintenance on their machines period.

Most of the comments I read must come from people passing on second hand information as the maintenance on my machine hasn't been anything out of the ordinary. Sure the full ink renewal is a pain in the bum but I'd like to see anyone printing over 100 metres of white ink on 1370 material in White -> CMYK mode. Roughly taking one metre per hour so it took about 4 days to print this job.

My only gripe is that I can't over ride the standard ink renewal prompts during an actual job. Hopefully they can fix this with a firmware update in the future.

I actually have more problems with the black ink and my black head then I do with my white ink and their respective heads. Go figure.
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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 9:17 am

My white ink experience is based on Direct to Garment printers including my own. I did an enormous amount of research prior to making a purchase and the common theme causing big problems was the use of white inks. More recently there's been a move towards sealed ink delivery systems and this has reduced the problems significantly.

Maybe the ink chemistry is different to textile inks - I'm sure it is. DTG inks are water based so no solvents to keep the ink flowing.

I should have thought more before posting :D DUH!
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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 10:27 am

Hey John,

That's cool. I guess different ink sets from different manufacturers will be made up differently and have different positives and negatives.

I can say from the Roland stand point I was even told and maybe talked out of the white ink option due to the maintenance but I haven't really noticed anything I'd consider too much work.

Maybe we treat our printers as production machines and do the normal maintenance once a day at bare minimum to ensure we have no problems while printing. I guess some people might see it as a thing they do once a week or something like that and that's why we don't see any issues.
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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 11:18 am

Our Rasterprinter UV flatbed machine ran white ink and we had no end of bother with it.
the machine comes with the white ink as an optional extra. even though i had no specific work in mind for it, i wanted the white ink purely so the machine was not limited in any way. the trouble, the white ink must be kept moving. i am not talking this being part of the daily or weekly maintenance, the actual machine pumped it thru itself as a result. so where did it go? it was dumped!
It was dumped even if NOT in use. so we're still buying white ink along with the others, even though you might never have run a job where white was required.
from memory, we would have to purge the white ink often after maintenance cleans didnt work in getting it going again. air in the vlaves or for whatever reason... and it resulted in more white ink being dumped.

the problem probably resulted in the fact the white ink wasn't being used, or used enough... as long as the machine was in constant production of all colours, you never experienced the problem, because of course, the ink was kept moving while printing, if printing, its making you money.

my point is that the issue with white inks is a real one. I am far from any sort of expert on all this, but my understanding is the white has to be a denser more potent ink than the others to achieve a true white. so this is why white appears to have more issues than any other for.

now all that said, I am "not" talking about a Roland machine with white Ink.
Maybe Roland have a much better system to handle white ink, i don't know. but thought i would mention it...
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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 11:20 am

Sorry I should of made it clear that I meant the Roland machines with white ink.
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Post Sun Jun 26, 2011 7:01 pm

I am pleased to see that their is a white recirculation system on the VS which I have only just started researching on, as I believe that this has the new DX6 head, which means smaller nozzles as well.

Ink is Agfa G2 ink for UV printers.

Rob is spot on with the White comments, I leave "flush" in the heads 24 hours a day as we rarely use our white, it is air-drying so it blocks the nozzles on our printer, if you dont have it in use daily it is not economical to unblock and use.

The ink contains titanium particles as well as this thicker more dense ink, it is not easy to print with unlike the coloured ink which is 99% perfect.

The AGFA has a stirring mechanism that is turning the ink around every 10 minutes or so, however if ink is left in the line after the recirculation system you have to purge it thru as the nozzle check will be not fluid and crisp enough.

If anything on a UV, the whole White printing saga is a big lesson, it is not easy at all.

If I look at another printer again, I am unlikely to be buying it for white or metallic.
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Post Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:40 pm

Ok, I been out seeing LOTS of printers today...

I been to Roland HQ today and saw this in the corner of the room....

It was connected by USB to a laptop, they were printing out some tests on it.

I had it confirmed that is indeed the same print head as the VS range, the DX6 and prices are indeed in £5-6K mark. The market really is just the prototyping and small specialist products market, it doesn't have the speed of the VS even tho it has the same head, it is very SLOW, not one of those machine to do a lot of work with.
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Post Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:51 pm

Thanks for the feedback, and I know what you mean Dave...
I also agree with allot of what Rodney Gold has said...
but i cannot help but still think this machine will be snapped up by the small sign shops, print shops and folk dipping their toe into digital printing, with the prospect of upgrading 6-12 months down the line to versacamm or the like.

the machine as you see it, packs allot in one desktop printer. metalic inks, contour cutting, vinyl cutting, t-shirt printing and more... it IS and will be seen for what it is capable of and that for a small sign shop, one man band, is everything!
I have never saw it running nor actually focused on the print speed until folk replied here. but still... the old pc600 served many sign businesses way back in the day, much stiffer opposition now granted, everyone wants everything yesterday. but for the guy doing a few vans a week to now be able to print full colour graphics in house and contour cut, its a big plus.

i think "we" as experienced sign makers are looking at the machine more with our own eyes / knowledge than the would be buyer. hell you only have to see how many chinese cutters are sold on ebay to know folk think more from their wallet than their brain. the set-backs like slow printing speed and the like are quickly shoved to the back of the issues list, when the thoughts of "what it can do" are considered. and who could blame them really.

Don't get me wrong here. if i was asked what someone should buy to get into the vinyl printing game ide say buy the versacamm with the prospect to upgrade. but i cant help but think these smaller machines are going to start appearing all over the place.
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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:56 am

Well, I have investigated the machine, 20 sq ft an hour at reasonable resolution is the speed , metallic ink is 3x the price of any other colour
It is still pretty pricey at 5k, you can buy a really nice 100w Laser for that money , bed size of 4ft x 4 ft. If I were a sign shop with a cutter only , I would rather get the laser than this desktop print/cut machine.
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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:40 am

Well, I dont think 2 odd square metres per hour is bad output for a small shop. Until fairly recently, the older SP300 / 540 were almost the standard sign shop printer. Been a few years since I worked on a SP300, but that was about 2.5 sqm/hr? My SP 540 prints at 3 sqm/hr, and still pumps away merrily next to the RS 640.....

I did not consider the SP slow - that mindset only came after the (3x faster) RS was installed. But the SP still outputs around 15 - 25 square metres per day, depending on how much is print only, and how much is print and cut.

I must say that my SP does not have a take up roller. That can almost double the output - an option you do not have on the desktop jobbie.

Even at 2 sqm/hr you can realistically output 10 sqm/day. Most small shops have a digital requirement of waaay less than that.

I take a peep at the Sign Africa website regularly. In the classifieds you find numerous 2 and 3 year old SP's, VS's etc. with only 300 - 600 hours on them. Many of those shops would have been better served by a smaller, slower, cheaper machine.

If only it was 24 inch wide.... :roll:

Edit: Our printer operator just brought his jobcards for yesterday down. He printed 33 square metres on the SP......Slow machines can still produce!!
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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:56 am

I'm a bit tempted by one of these, mainly for labels. I buy in digitally printed banners and larger graphics from people with machines I could never hope to own or want to but relatively small run labels, stickers and garments from a machine in my own modestly sized workshop could be interesting. I think Rob sums up the market for this machine pretty well.
Alan D
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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 10:47 am

Well, I also saw the VS, the reason why I went out to see printers is to get an insight what the quality is like however the VS printing on Normal vinyl speed is sadly not right. They were using MD5-100 and this is considered to be one of the best vinyl out there by many printer manufacturers and it was mottling badly as if it was not drying quickly enough and over-inking, we changed profile and it did it again, they couldn't get it right but seeing other samples it appears that quality mode was working well.

We spent ages waiting for it to finish printing a 1.6mtr by 1mtr print, it doesn't seem to use traditional Passes but this intelligent interweave technology and it is the equivalent of something like 16-pass 720x720 resolution on a JV3.

We also questioned their speeds of print, will dig out our notes but they didn't add up to advertised info.

The only saving grace is the dual CMYK machine is faster, but wasn't available as they just sold it!


The little printer, maybe tempting for a one man band sign maker, maybe an overnight print or something like stickers for model making. but nahh... moves like it is running on ballscrew type setup instead in a CNC, high revs with little head movement
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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 11:20 am

I liked the HP at the roadshow.

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Post Wed Jul 06, 2011 6:54 pm

Media for the BN20

Lorraine Clinch wrote:Looks like a great little unit, but as Chris says, no white ink, and would have to stock yet another size vinyl! Still interesting though.

If anyone gets to know the price, I'd be interested to hear it!!!

Lorraine :lol1:


Hi just to let you know there will be a range of polyester based self adhesive materials specifically for the BN20
Regards Jan
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Post Thu Apr 30, 2015 5:50 pm

Re: The Worlds 1st low-cost Print & Cut desktop machine!

Have been looking for a little machine like this for a while but a little confused too at the roll width of 500mm?!
This does come with white ink according to Grafityp website - 4 cmyk/5 cmyk + metallic + white.
Hope they haven't got it wrong as it's very useful having the white ink option.

If they are 5k then not a bad price and although some are comparing it to the old edge machine, I first learnt on the edge and thought it was fantastic at the time (the software was a little hairy) but it dominated for a long time :)
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Post Fri May 01, 2015 9:23 am

Re: The Worlds 1st low-cost Print & Cut desktop machine!

Hi Jean,

There is indeed a white option on the bn-20 making it a great little printer with good versatility! Most suppliers would offer media at this width, I know we have a specific media brochure for the BN-20 that we send out to new BN-20 users.

Cat.
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Post Fri May 01, 2015 1:03 pm

Re: The Worlds 1st low-cost Print & Cut desktop machine!

Hi Jean
We had a BN-20 as our entry into print and cut and it is a great little machine (CMYK). Very versatile and will handle a lot of different media types - most suppliers will cut rolls to 500mm if not supplied as straight 500mm. Yes it is slower than bigger machines but you can let it get on with running while you do something else so if not into high speed production then productivity doesn't suffer. Within a year we got a VS640 for wide format work and found the transition really easy as what you learned on the BN-20/Versaworks is 95% of what you need on the VS. Have a read of this thread and others re metallic or white ink options and their cost effectiveness/usefulness/maintenance. For window decals we reverse print and flood coated white vinyl. When we got the vs640, again we didn't go for white or metallic.
Cheers
Hugh

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