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What did you want to be when you were older?

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Robert Lambie

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:12 am

What did you want to be when you were older?

I am not 100% just now but i recon ill be looking to get a new member of staff in the next couple of weeks. As we all know, finding staff is an expensive time consuming gamble. but i think even more so for our game...
when folk speak to me about it i always say, well when we are at school as kids, we hear...
When i grow up, i want to be a...

Plumber
Electrician
Mechanic
Joiner
Nurse
Doctor
Teacher
etc etc

I don't think i have ever heard anyone back then, or upto now for that matter ever say... I want to be a signmaker. :lol1:

we had a thread a while back about what we used to be before signs... but can you remember what you "wanted to be" when you got older?

maybe this is where seeds should be planted... secondary school...
our trade is so diverse there are many skills within it to attract many types of talented youngsters, but when signmaking is ever mentioned they just think of the traditional way of "by the brush". nothing at all wrong with that but there is so many areas to be involved in.
If they don't know, they are never ever going to consider an advert for sign making employment never mind considering being one when they grow up!

anyway... i just think more should be done to introduce the trade to schools...

So did anyone actually WANT to become a signmaker, if not, then what?

I always remember wanting to be a policeman, but the closest i ever got to that was in the "back" of one of their cars... :lol1: good job anyway, can you picture an umpah-lump in a police uniform? :wink:
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Warren Beard

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:19 am

For me it was first Truck driver, you know the big ones with like a gazillion wheels and bright lights all over the front :o

Then when I turned about 3 :roll: .....

..... I wanted to be a chef.

Almost dropped out of school to go to chef/hotel school but my mother changed her mind and forced me to finish school first.

Good thing to as it paved the path to where I am now :P
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Marcella Ross

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:21 am

well I certainly didn't want to be a police officer ..... but that's what I ended up doing!

What I wanted to be when I grew up was a Draughtsman!
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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:22 am

When I was very very little (maybe 4) I wanted to be a ballerina.
It only took a few classes (I wandered out of the class and went to Woolworth's) to know that I was definitely the most uncoordinated girl in Pennsylvania. I still do have a tiny leotard in the attic.

By age 5 I realized I was an artist.
Kids used to get me to draw pictures for them in Kindergarten.
But I wanted to be an archaeologist.
It only took a few classes of Catholic school to realize I was no science whiz. And a few beatings! Apparently I was no Catholic either.

So I got real good at art. It was not a conscious decision just something I loved doing which set me apart from other kids. I consistently won art awards at school and even a scholarship to art classes on Saturdays.
It only took a few classes to realize that I hated structure and direction.

By high school I wanted to be a famous artist.
So I never took a single typing class.
But I did take every art class the school offered.
I also wanted to be an art historian but my dad would not let me go to college. So I went to art school.
It only took one class for me to hate it.
But my dad made me stick it out and I did take layout and perceptive and figure drawing for 6 months.

Then I fell in love and got married and realized what I wanted most was to be a mom. There were no classes for that so I could not quit.
Then I became a signwriter by accident, that was 25 years ago and never did take a class.
(My cousin needed something lettered and he knew I learned hand lettering in art school and he kept getting me more jobs)
Love....Jill
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Martin Pearson

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:32 am

Robert, when I was at school I don't remember any of the kids Parents or Family being involved with Signmaking at all, you kind of got to know what a lot of peoples Dad's did and I can't remember it ever being mentioned, in fact I would go as far as to say that I didn't even realise there was such a trade. Yes there are signs everywhere you look but I don't think it ever occurred to me that someone must have made them and put them there !!

At school I honestly can't remember what I wanted to be when I grew up ( Still waiting) but as I reached the age that I had to think about some sort of career I decided I would like to go into teaching and be a Physical Education Teacher, I was good at sport so it seemed to be a good bet. Trouble is I wasn't to hot on the academic side so that put paid to that.

In fact I will go further than just saying that I didn't think of it as a serious career when I was at school, when I was looking for something to do after I was medically discharged from the Royal Navy Signmaking was one of the options mentioned and I dismissed it straight away to start with because to me it was just something above a shop and that wasn't going to be much of a job.
It wasn't until I was bored one day and decided to have a look at what it involved that I realised just how big and diverse an industry it was.
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Phill Fenton

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:45 am

For a while a toyed with the idea of becoming a mad scientist, but then I decided I wanted to be an F1 racing car driver or an airline pilot.

In retrospect I think I should have followed my dreams cos they seem to be quite well paid jobs (apart from the mad scientist bit ..unless I was to have reached the heights of a bond villain) :-?
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Phill Fenton

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:57 am

I'm trying to encourage my Kids to be ambitious and go for a career in the local council. Reasonably well paid, bullet proof security (no one would ever dream of trying to fire you), 5 weeks annual paid holiday plus public holidays, plus sick leave (minimum entitlement - 4 weeks per year, currently under negotiation in the current round of pay talks to be increased to five weeks), final salary pension available from age 55.

Any one would have to be a fool to want to work anywhere else :-?
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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:59 am

I cant honestly remember what I wanted to do, just that I was good with my hands, and although fairly intelligent, preferred a practical future, as opposed to academic.
but there must have been many things that I did not even think about,
Butcher, Taxidermist, funeral director, manicurist, deep sea fisherman, female impersonator, dog warden, and signmaker, to name a few.

I dont think many kids grow up to be what they thought they wanted to be. We follow a route with many different turns choosing each one as we approach to find our final destination.


Peter
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Harry Cleary

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:30 am

Me? It's never too late to have a happy childhood! :D I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up. :(
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Nigel Hindley

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 2:02 am

Re: What did you want to be when you were older?

Robert Lambie wrote:I am not 100% just now but i recon ill be looking to get a new member of staff in the next couple of weeks. As we all know, finding staff is an expensive time consuming gamble. but i think even more so for our game...
when folk speak to me about it i always say, well when we are at school as kids, we hear...
When i grow up, i want to be a...

Plumber
Electrician
Mechanic
Joiner
Nurse
Doctor
Teacher
etc etc

I don't think i have ever heard anyone back then, or upto now for that matter ever say... I want to be a signmaker. :lol1:

we had a thread a while back about what we used to be before signs... but can you remember what you "wanted to be" when you got older?

maybe this is where seeds should be planted... secondary school...
our trade is so diverse there are many skills within it to attract many types of talented youngsters, but when signmaking is ever mentioned they just think of the traditional way of "by the brush". nothing at all wrong with that but there is so many areas to be involved in.
If they don't know, they are never ever going to consider an advert for sign making employment never mind considering being one when they grow up!

anyway... i just think more should be done to introduce the trade to schools...

So did anyone actually WANT to become a signmaker, if not, then what?

I always remember wanting to be a policeman, but the closest i ever got to that was in the "back" of one of their cars... :lol1: good job anyway, can you picture an umpah-lump in a police uniform? :wink:


As we were poor when we young all i wanted was to have work and money I didn't care what it was I would do, I wasn't to proud to try anything and I have gone on and done quite a few things and that drive of never wanting to be poor again has stood me in good stead! but now i want to retire and wouldn't mind being a bit poorer and having a little less, we could all live with a little less!

I think the world has changed now though and many kids do want to get involved in sign industry or graphic design. I'm not sure whether other schools around the country do this but our local school does work experience and every year we have quite a few kids wanting to come and do their experience with us they actually choose to, we only take one but usually there are a few wanting to so id say there is more of an interest or at at least awareness which is great. I have also been approached to do evening classes in basic design methods for adults which I found astonishing that there was demand for this.
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Duncan Wilkie

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 4:18 am

Up until grade 10 I was going to be a Chemist/Scientist. Somewhere in grade 10 I discovered Speedball pens and calligraphy. I never turned back. After I graduated grade 12. I took a 1 year Commercial Signwriting Course and the rest is history. I'm a Grand dad now and still love making signs.
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Andy Gorman

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 4:22 am

When I was at school one of my mates told me about his dad who was a signwriter. I thought "that sounds alright, I'll do that".

Strange thing is, I'm now working with his dad on jobs 30 years later.

So, I did want to be a signwriter, but ended up a signmaker. Near enough!
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John Childs

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 6:10 am

I never gave much thought as to what I wanted to be.

Although there was never any pressure, I think it was always assumed that I would go into the family business in the motor trade. I wasn't totally against that idea, but wasn't having anything of only getting the job just because I was the boss's son. I wanted to be able to show, but mainly to prove to myself, that I could get, and hold down a job on my own merits. I ended up as a trainee draughtsman for the York Trailer Company.

After a few years I did wind up in the family business and, although it was fun to start with, I became disillusioned and decided to get out. After a few months of looking for a new career I stumbled across this game and have been doing it ever since.

It was the same with my children, but probably for different reasons, that they didn't want to come to work with me. I'd have been happy to have either, or both, of them in the business and to pass it down to the next generation, but I'm equally happy that they are doing want they want. Nowadays, one's an accountant and the other is in the legal business.

I should add that I never was an artist. I was always cr@p at it at school and, if it wasn't for computers, then I never would have got into signs. Which is funny because, with the way my business has developed, I don't do any of that nowadays anyway. It's been a long time since I put a sticky letter on a van.
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John Wilson

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 10:31 am

I wanted to be unemployed and a beach bum lol

Ayr beach didn't really cut it for me so I took up work :lol1:
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David Rowland

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 10:37 am

John Wilson wrote:I wanted to be unemployed and a beach bum lol

Ayr beach didn't really cut it for me so I took up work :lol1:


Rob, John's CV is already with you :lol1: Good job Karen doesn't visit the forums lol

When I was a boy I wanted to be computer games programmer, to create those fantastic 8bit games like Treasure Island Dizzy! Well done something similar to that but not games.
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Shane Drew

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:27 pm

I wanted to do anything my dad did. When I was in primary school, my dad was a VW salesman. So I always planned to do that.

As I got older my dad changed direction, he and mum bought a cleaning business, so that is what I wanted to do. My sister left school at 15 and went to work with mum and dad, and when I left school at 15, I did too. Deep down I enjoyed doodling, selling, writing and making up tag lines. Used to drive mum and dad nuts.

I always remember the careers advisor at school asking us the question 'what do you want to do when you leave school'. All my mates wanted to be management material, and I said I was going to be a cleaner. I remember everyone laughed at me but the careers advisor told everyone that I was the only realist among them.

By the time I was 21, I was operations managers for one of my parents cleaning divisions, on call 24/7 while most of my friends were either in jail, in the navy, dead (several died from overdoses) or on the dole. Only one of my friends made it really big and he toured the world as one of these fancy pancy bar tenders that make these fancy pancy drinks :lol1:

I worked for dad for many years, now he works for me.

Got in to the sign game by accident really, but I loved it as soon as I started. Now, I write articles for some trade mags, I have friends and associates around the world (including UKSBers) and I hope my kids follow me into the trade when the time comes.
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Liam Pattison

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:46 pm

I always wanted to be an artist of some kind, so i enjoy that side of signmaking.

I was picking up the backing and facing paper from around the bottom of my dads trestles since i was about 8 or something (he paid me £10 per day, i thought it was loads) so i was probably always destined to do something to do with signs.

I think if you want to be a designer, sign making is a great area to go into, it is a big industry that many people don't really know anything about.

Signs are everywhere you look but this trade goes slightly unnoticed, especially by young people. I don't know weather that is good or bad though.

The less people that know about it the more work for us.

Liam
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Gill Harrison

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 2:41 pm

Like so many others I never had a clue what I wanted…….I knew I wasn’t bright enough to go to university or anything like that and being the daughter of dairy farmers I think Mam n Dad’s plan for me was to marry a local farmers son and have 5 kids…..not my thing :-?

Left school after my GCSE’s and had 2 job interviews in the first week………..1 was in the towns factory Glaxo where the pay was good but I’d be just another number and the other was at Smiths were the advert had said minimum requirement was 2 years art, I’d always enjoyed art but when I rang and they said I’d be “weeding” I couldn't work that one out but I liked the feel of the place and in answer to the original question I never wanted to be a sign-maker until I'd walked around the signshop and as soon as I did I knew it was the right industry for me :lol1: so 2 weeks before my 16th birthday I started my life as a sign maker and totally loved it…..no 2 days are the same :lol1: :lol1:

It has always amazed me that the one thing that held me back at school I ended up needing “spelling” but I never needed to do design on account of the customers being other sign-makers who had already done the hard bit. I think good basic maths comes into it as scaling ect is a must and my boss insisted I learn both metric and imperial conversion in the first week as some people work in inches some mm and many mix the 2 :lol1:

In my present roll at Smiths I do really miss the huge feeling of achievement when a jobs finished and you stand back and think "I made that"

:lol1:
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Mike Grant

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 3:01 pm

My parents never had any ambition and it certainly rubbed off on me. My parents are in their 80's and neither of them has ever driven a car to this day.
When I was a teenager I had no clue as to what I wanted to do and one day my best mate said to me "My uncle has a sign business, as you are good at drawing (my only gifted talent) do you want me to set up an interview with him" The rest is history. I had my first wage packet of £6 on my 16th birthday. Now 36 years later I am still in the same business literally as I now own that very same business and I am still as poor as a church mouse. There has to be some logic in there somewhere! :roll:

Rob, my CV is in the post! :D
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Mike Grant

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Post Sat Jan 16, 2010 3:04 pm

Re: What did you want to be when you were older?

Robert Lambie wrote:I always remember wanting to be a policeman, but the closest i ever got to that was in the "back" of one of their cars...


OK Lambie spill the beans, we all want to know! (chat.)
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Martin Pearson

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Post Sun Jan 17, 2010 12:28 am

Nobody's said they wanted to be a train driver when they grew up, just shows how times have changed as at one time I think most little boys would have said that.

Oh before I forget Robert, where do I send my CV :lol1:
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John Cooper

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Post Sun Jan 17, 2010 1:08 am

Yup, train driver like Casey Jones.
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Matty Goodwin

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Post Sun Jan 17, 2010 1:26 am

My story...

Wanted to leave school to be a graphic designer ('85)

Got a YTS position with a sign company.

Spent the days blowing up letters from a letterset catologue on a photocopier, sticking the letters on vinyl, cutting round them to produce the text needed to then apply it to a piece of perspex hand cut to fit inside a hand cut panatrim frame to realise the boss had measured the fascia wrong!

Went on to do 2D and 3D CAD as a draughtsman and back to sign design and fitting.

THEN wrapping came in! Saw what my employers were paying contractors and thort.mmm...Ill have some of that and havn't looked back since, although the comfort of full time employment would relieve alot of family stress!!

As Jillbeans said she wanted to be a mum, I wanted to be a dad and a very proud one now, and if my daughter wants to follow my steps I'd support her all the way. Modelling that is!!
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Nicola McIntosh

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Post Sun Jan 17, 2010 3:02 am

matty goodwin wrote:Modelling that is!!


:lol1: :lol1:

nik

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