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Network cabling setup - advice needed please

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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:18 pm

Network cabling setup - advice needed please

Morning All,

I successfully managed to install our new server yesterday (got the workstations to setup - was meant to be this mornings job but the weather has stopped that idea!)

When the company who supplied the server delivered it they suggested our current wiring setup might cause "bottle necks" and slow transfers of files etc. I'm wanting to centrally store all our design, engraving and general admin files on the server rather than on individual workstations but I have concerns that the cabling setup might make it counter productive.

I've uploaded a pdf on our website, page one showing our current setup and the other showing what I think would be the best bet (with the addition of some gigabit switches rather than the standard 10/100). The drawing doesn't show it very well but the workstations in the office and production are around 25m metres apart so it makes it very difficult to run cabling direct from the workstations to the switch. I assume that the workstations don't have to be physically plugged into the adsl router to access the internet?

I was hoping someone could let me know if the idea I've got is on the right lines.

PDF is on http://www.cleveland-studios.co.uk/client_proof/network_installation.pdf

Thanks in advance

Andy
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:38 pm

Morning Andy.

I've recently put in a proper server, after some years of using a NAS drive to store files.

We are all Apple kit, but I don't think that makes much difference with regard to network layout. Anyway, your proposed system looks pretty much like what we have, so I don't see that you'll have any problem.

From my understanding, the only thing you'll need to do with that layout, if you are using DHCP rather than fixed IP addresses, is to have your ADSL router issue the numbers, and not your server.

I wish I'd done ours sooner because, although our network wiring hasn't changed, file transfer speeds are so much better now than they were with the NAS drive.
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:45 pm

Hi John,

Thanks for the prompt reply, the engineer set up windows server 2008 to assign the IP addresses etc (through DHCP I believe)

Why would the router need to assign these over the server, not doubting you just trying to understand a little better.

Andy
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 1:22 pm

I don't honestly know Andy. I'm no expert. I just set up our server according to the book that came with it.

In there various configuration options were shown and in every case, except one, it said that the router should issue DHCP IP addresses.

The exception was when you have the router connected to the server, and everything else fed from the server. I'm not sure that's clear, but if you think of it as the server being between every computer and the router, instead of being off to one side, that might help.

Quite why they say that I'm not sure, but I think it's something to do with security.

If you stick your server between the router and the first switch, then you'll be fine.
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 2:02 pm

i come back to you in a moment andy
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 2:37 pm

the suggested setup is right, your current setup is slow and can cause some issues. i have done a map for u , i will email it to you, i cant post here as the boards are not enabled for files.

The network router can be setup on a seperate network card in the server, this is reconmended by Microsoft but causes issues using a wifi part of a router.

DHCP should really be the server and not the router. Routers can lock up sending your network haywire if the switched on computers cannot find who's boss, Servers normally on 24hr and can handle DHCP better that way, only causes some setup headaches if your using wifi on the router but you can get over that with a draytek as it got some clever routing options to split wifi to a seperate network direct to a spare interface on the server for 99% protected network (on a seperate subnet can be setup too)
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 3:16 pm

Can you mail me the map also please Dave.
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 4:05 pm

Re: Network cabling setup - advice needed please

John, I've uploaded Dave's onto our website http://www.cleveland-studios.co.uk/client_proof/network_map.pdf


Thanks for confirming my assumptions Dave - have spotted some nice 16 port gigabit switches for £50-ish so will get them sorted next week.

Next trick is to setup the fax server role on server 2008, fingers crossed!

Thanks again
Andy
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 4:56 pm

ok.. so why didn't you go for Small business server 2008 when you got your kit Andy? unless your handling your email another way.

Fax server in SBS2003 is pretty straight forward.
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Post Sat Jan 09, 2010 7:07 pm

We got standard to save a few quid Dave - we also got SAP business one for our accounting etc which with the training, installation and some custom coding came to a hefty amount.

Our emails are just going to be handled by individual pop accounts

Andy
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Post Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:53 am

Just had a look at the way our server is set up and its exactly the same as the suggested drawing...
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Post Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:07 pm

hello,

Dave do I set my windows server to the DNS IP addresses the ISP has given me? I have active directory and DHCP working on my server but cannot connect to the internet.

Thanks

Ian
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Post Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:17 pm

As you've probably guessed Ian I'm not an expert as these things but I'm certain when the engineer set our active directory etc up he keyed in the DNS values for Virgin media.

Sure Dave will confirm though.

Andy
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Post Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:39 am

The network card in the server points to itself, so mine has the same IP address in as it is a DNS server.
In DNS Management, if you do "properties" on your server name, then go to "Forwarders" my ISP's DNS IPs are in there.

oh in SBS, the active directory is actually built behind the scenes as adding a computer is just a quick wizard, with regards cost saving thats a bit awkward as SBS in my view with Exchange and all the wizards is a cost saving blessing.

I am going to be doing a review soon, but with so many online Exchange accounts now, I need to look at them in more detail.
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Post Tue Jan 12, 2010 9:08 am

Thanks both ill have a look at that later.

Ian
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Post Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:34 am

Dave Rowland wrote:The network card in the server points to itself, so mine has the same IP address in as it is a DNS server.
In DNS Management, if you do "properties" on your server name, then go to "Forwarders" my ISP's DNS IPs are in there.

oh in SBS, the active directory is actually built behind the scenes as adding a computer is just a quick wizard, with regards cost saving thats a bit awkward as SBS in my view with Exchange and all the wizards is a cost saving blessing.

I am going to be doing a review soon, but with so many online Exchange accounts now, I need to look at them in more detail.


SBS is very good with one proviso that I have found which is that if you stray from the route prescribed it tends to bite back!

I'm not an engineer either - but found that the install was good and we had no issues with the DNS despite having all sorts of inbound tunnels etc.

Oo

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