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Window vinyl problems

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Post Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:19 pm

Window vinyl problems

Hi everyone.

We recently applied some vinyl text to a window and then flood coated the whole window with a different colour vinyl.

We used the usual mildly soapy water solution to float the large panels on.

We have now got white "misty" patches all over the window. We think it's where the water has evaporated and left some of the soapy residue behind.

Has anyone experienced this themselves, and is there a remedy to get rid of these marks.

Many thanks for any tips you may be able to pass on.

Nick
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Post Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:43 pm

The vinyl had probably got an waterbased glue,

Should dryout over time, depends on the amount of Soap

Ian
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Post Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:05 pm

Not sure if its the same with vinyl as with window film but with window film you will always have what looks like condensation between the film and the glass initially after install. It does dry ok, some times quicker than others depending on heat, sunlight and surroundings etc

The only thing that I find causes problems is the application fluid, depends what you use, we always use Jonsons baby bath, no lanolin to affect the adhesive, dont use cheap detergent.

For graphics or text tend to use rapid tac 2 if doing it wet.

Bob (mainly window films we do )
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Post Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:10 pm

To use a tried and tested response.....


...I agree.

When I started 'doing signs', I did a window three times because of the presence of milkyness, then gave up and let the chap have the job for nowt.

I drove past a couple of weeks after fitting and it was perfect, all the milkyness had gone, so a lesson learned there.


Now I tell all customers it will go, safe in the knowledge that it will
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Post Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:35 pm

Gareth Lewis wrote:When I started 'doing signs', I did a window three times because of the presence of milkyness, then gave up and let the chap have the job for nowt.

I drove past a couple of weeks after fitting and it was perfect, all the milkyness had gone

*rofl*

Thanks Gareth. That made me laugh. :D




And it's nice to know that it's not just me that does things like that. :D
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Post Wed Dec 16, 2009 9:05 pm

we had the same problem with three windows we did for a hair salon,when we fitted the vinyl it was a cold day went back the following day and the whole thing was white marks,but after a few days of heat from the shop its spot on now....phew.
cheers
jill
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Post Thu Dec 17, 2009 12:30 am

Good to carry heat with you (hair dryer - or gun)

Says I who tends to forget :-?
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 9:59 pm

Nick yes!! The worst thing you could do is remove the vinyl. This will eventually go in about 1-2 weeks may be sooner. this is quite simply due to the cold which is what i have found. did you apply frosted vinyl by any chance?? I have experienced this quite a bit with frosted material. it looks really nasty and you would think about it twice about going away but once it does it goes completely. Just wait and see!! :D
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:13 pm

if you learn to do it dry, then you will not have this problem, it is my opinion that the customer should not have to wait a few days for the vinyl to dry out, the number of people that will see the window whilst it is "drying" will only think a crappy job has been done, not good for the client or the the firm that applied it.

Peter
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:52 pm

Peter Normington wrote:if you learn to do it dry, then you will not have this problem, it is my opinion that the customer should not have to wait a few days for the vinyl to dry out, the number of people that will see the window whilst it is "drying" will only think a crappy job has been done, not good for the client or the the firm that applied it.

Peter

And I suspect you probably think it's unreasonable for a painter and decorator to expect his customers to wait for paint to dry as well :-?
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:37 pm

Phill wrote:
Peter Normington wrote:if you learn to do it dry, then you will not have this problem, it is my opinion that the customer should not have to wait a few days for the vinyl to dry out, the number of people that will see the window whilst it is "drying" will only think a crappy job has been done, not good for the client or the the firm that applied it.

Peter

And I suspect you probably think it's unreasonable for a painter and decorator to expect his customers to wait for paint to dry as well :-?

but the paint would look as finished, even when wet, a "do not touch,wet paint" sign would be optional

do you put a sign up saying, "this window will look good in a couple of days"?

Peter
:D

Peter
I doubt if sainsbury's or TESCO would acccept that their windows would look crap for a couple of days whilst they dried out?
Last edited by Peter Normington on Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:43 pm

Peter Normington wrote:but the paint would look as finished, even when wet, a "do not touch,wet paint" sign would be optional


Apart from on a park bench - when it's more fun not to bother with the sign :-?
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Post Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:44 pm

Phill wrote:
Peter Normington wrote:but the paint would look as finished, even when wet, a "do not touch,wet paint" sign would be optional


Apart from on a park bench - when it's more fun not to bother with the sign :-?


:D
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:00 am

Anyway Phil, when I had my house painted yellow, the decorator did not say it could appear green for a few days, going back to the subject, I still think it unacceptable for the client to wait for a few days for etch or any vinyl to dry out, other people may have other standards

peter
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:07 am

I know what you mean Peter. The buggers that built my house extension told me after they laid the concrete that I would have to wait a week for it to dry before they could start the bricklaying.

Bleeding amateurs :-?
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:17 am

Phill wrote:I know what you mean Peter. The buggers that built my house extension told me after they laid the concrete that I would have to wait a week for it to dry before they could start the bricklaying.

Bleeding amateurs :-?

Phil, lets cut to the quick, are you saying its acceptable for vinyl applied to glass to have milky stains for several days?

I dont think so, and as a professional, dont think I should be saying it is to others.

Peter
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:24 am

I do believe flood coating wet is a recognised and acceptable method. In many cases more desirable than trying to do it dry (which has it's own issues). If short term milkiness during drying results then that is an acceptable part of the process. Each job is different and we must choose the best method to use for each application. In most cases I apply vinyl dry but when flood coating a large area such as a window - and the need to reposition - or applying a large section of vinyl by a single person unassisted - wet is often the best way to do it and will often provide the customer with a better end product.
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:38 am

Phill wrote:I do believe flood coating wet is a recognised and acceptable method. In many cases more desirable than trying to do it dry (which has it's own issues). If short term milkiness during drying results then that is an acceptable part of the process. Each job is different and we must choose the best method to use for each application. In most cases I apply vinyl dry but when flood coating a large area such as a window - and the need to reposition - or applying a large section of vinyl by a single person unassisted - wet is often the best way to do it and will often provide the customer with a better end product.


I dont think it is acceptable, however you apply, when you leave the job, it should be finished.
perhaps the problem lies with using the correct fluid for the particular type of adhesive?

Peter
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:45 am

:roll:
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:01 am

:roll:
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:19 am

We wouldn't use a vinyl with a water based adhesive if we knew we were applying it wet :D :D love your discussions though :wink:
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:36 am

Good

He's off to bed now, so I can get the last word in...

what was the question again :-?
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:51 am

I am so with Peter here. :D
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Post Sat Dec 19, 2009 1:57 am

(cheesy)

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