my invisible text
Categories
  • TIMELINE

SignLab vs. EasySign

<<

Wojciech.Szul

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 8:48 pm





Post Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:35 pm

SignLab vs. EasySign

I'm considering buying SL
Can anyone compare SignLab with EasySign ?

I'm still owner of EasySign which I'm bouth years ago, but world goes forward.
My main direction is a logo designs & cutting complicated vecotr graphics with many Bezier curves. I'm using for that older version of Corel Draw - and this is my main designer tool - and I have big load of archives in cdr and eps format.

Any suggestions, opinions?
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:27 pm

Sign software

If I'm honest...Neither!

In my experience the sooner you make the switch to Illustrator & Photoshop the better, however if you want to go down the sign software path then I would recommend Flexisign Pro as I have found this the most intuitive Sign software I have used (although this was about 7 years ago)

If your plotter will talk to an Illustrator plug-in then get a copy of Illustrator and start using it for your artwork design and production instead. I run a plotter using Illustrator, even from my laptop when required!

In my opinion sign software is poorly written and is limited in most aspects of what you need on a daily basis. There are perhaps some tasks that the likes of Flexisign, signlab etc do easier than Illustrator but I can't think of enough to make it worth sticking with sign software.

Apart from the obvious (once you start using it) benefits from using a professional vector design software like Illustrator is that your already talking the same language as 99.9% of all Graphic designers and Graphics professionals all over the world. As a consequence you will make yourself more "user friendly" from the clients point of view, especially when dealing with design agencies!

I hope this helps

Cheers
<<

Brian Hays

User avatar

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 2476

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2002 1:00 am





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:49 pm

Re: Sign software

Darren Richards wrote:If I'm honest...Neither!

In my experience the sooner you make the switch to Illustrator & Photoshop the better, however if you want to go down the sign software path then I would recommend Flexisign Pro as I have found this the most intuitive Sign software I have used (although this was about 7 years ago)

If your plotter will talk to an Illustrator plug-in then get a copy of Illustrator and start using it for your artwork design and production instead. I run a plotter using Illustrator, even from my laptop when required!

In my opinion sign software is poorly written and is limited in most aspects of what you need on a daily basis. There are perhaps some tasks that the likes of Flexisign, signlab etc do easier than Illustrator but I can't think of enough to make it worth sticking with sign software.

Apart from the obvious (once you start using it) benefits from using a professional vector design software like Illustrator is that your already talking the same language as 99.9% of all Graphic designers and Graphics professionals all over the world. As a consequence you will make yourself more "user friendly" from the clients point of view, especially when dealing with design agencies!

I hope this helps

Cheers


SignLab & EasySign "limited" you are having a laugh Mr.?

They are written specifically for Sign Making! Illustrator isn't!

You cannot even do simple things like pull up a vehicle full size in Illustrator. :lol1:
<<
User avatar

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 14363

Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 2:36 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:18 pm

Wojciech.Szul


Unfortunately, most graphics professionals dont have a clue when it comes to signs, most are print and web orientated, no disrespect to them, but for signs, Signlab reaches the bits that illustrator cant :D

just my humble opinion, I know others on the boards have different views.

so the best way is to download or get a demo of signlab, play with it for a while and make up your own mind

Peter
<<

DavidRogers

User avatar

L-Gold Member
L-Gold Member

Posts: 5163

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:01 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:21 pm

A few sweeping statements in there Darren. :lol1:

You, as a past user of Flexi (7 years) are looking at something that's moved on a bit since then I'll bet. As for Signlab - again it's dedicated software for signmakers - not 'designers' with a plug-in to allow basic cutting.

...and Photoshop is sod-all use for the vector work Wojciech.Szul intends. It's FANTASTIC for print...not so great for cut vinyl work.

Illustrator to all intents & purposes can never match a proper sign programs for complexity or 'covering all the bases'. And the 'universal' aspect of it soon wears thin when you get sent dodgy files unsuitable for cutting over & over again...print, yeh, great, it doesn't matter about incomplete lines & stupid overlaps....

The Flexi / Signlab debate will rage on forever, but each has it's own merits that experienced users love.

Me - I've been on various Signlabs for the last 13 or so years and it's second nature...the few times I've witnessed someone using Flexi...well, I think it was more user incompetence than 'dodgy program' when I saw the end results.

Wojciech.Szul - PERSONALLY, I'd say download the free trial versions (you can't cut or save - but you'll get an idea of how they work).

Dave
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:30 pm

Re: Sign software

SignLab & EasySign "limited" you are having a laugh Mr.?
They are written specifically for Sign Making! Illustrator isn't!
You cannot even do simple things like pull up a vehicle full size in Illustrator. :lol1:


Try telling that to the guys that wrap over 2000 vehicles a year and produce award winning signage or many other top level sign firms.

I switched one of the UK's top Trade print providers & wrapping companies over from using Signlab to cut from to cutting directly from illustrator as this gave them flexibility and continuity from design to production even at extremely large scales without having to use any specifically made sign making software.

I'm not saying they don't have there place for the fledgling sign maker but I stand by my opinion that the sooner you regard signmaking software as, at best, little more than a portal for your illustrator files the better.

Its true that you can't open a vehicle outline at full size in Illustrator but most people would work at 10% scale in Illustrator then rescale in the RIP or cutter control interface. As most signmakers have to incorporate print into there work this seems a logical move to me as you can't possibly argue that Sign software handles or manipulates large graphic files better than Illustrator and photoshop, surely?
<<

DavidRogers

User avatar

L-Gold Member
L-Gold Member

Posts: 5163

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:01 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:37 pm

Quick question Darren - are YOU a signmaker...and do you have daily experience in signage manufacture and design.

What a WRAPPING company does has absolutely NO bearing on what the original poster wanted to know.

As for working at 10% and scaling the RIP...why? I work full size, full res - in the end it's the same DPI...scaling is a 'trick' designers often use because their software can't handle large 'pages'...hmmm, unlike sign software.

I find some humour in "I'm not saying they don't have there place for the fledgling sign maker but I stand by my opinion that the sooner you regard signmaking software as, at best, little more than a portal for your illustrator files the better. " :lol1: :roll:

Obviously you are allowed your opinion....
Last edited by DavidRogers on Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:51 pm, edited 3 times in total.
<<

Karl Williams

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 4225

Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 9:31 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:40 pm

Re: Sign software

Mr. Richards,
Both Signlab and Easysign are cracking programmes.










mod-edit
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 10:39 pm

David Rogers wrote:Quick question Darren - are YOU a signmaker...and do you have daily experience in signage manufacture and design.

What a WRAPPING company does has absolutely NO bearing on what the original poster wanted to know.

WRAPPING requires a good 'graphics' program to get the best out of it...Photoshop would be an ideal candidate...hardy vector cutting is it now?

As for working at 10% and scaling the RIP...why? I work full size, full res - in the end it's the same DPI...scaling is a 'trick' designers often use because their software can't handle large 'pages'...hmmm, unlike sign software.


David - YOU seem offended in some way, I AM a sign maker with 19 years experience in many aspects of sign making.

I only recommended Illustrator as the vector package and not Photoshop. I merely mentioned Photoshop as a complimentary package should the need arise...as I said most sign makers are required to incorporate print in some way into there day to day work. This makes sense does it not?

My referral to the vehicle wrapping firm DOES have a bearing on the original post as I was trying to help him by suggesting an alternative to either package and to highlight the fact that at the higher levels, sign software is consigned to the bin and that there are many features that even entry level sign makers will benefit from by making the switch sooner rather than later. Illustrator is also very cheap when compared to full blown sign packages. Of course this option is fine as long as your plotter will work with Illustrator so I'm not saying its for everyone.

By the way, Whats the problem with working at a 10% or 25% scale? Its hardly a trick, just a way of working. For most signs you can work at 100% anyway. Not really a drawback in my opinion but if your maths is poor then I guess it could be :D !

I meant that sign making software is often fairly basic and limited, not the user! I know some excellent sign makers who use a plotter, an old Gerber edge, a scalpel and a healthy application of common sense with top notch results, all I'm saying is that there are perfectly viable and often cheaper alternatives to effective vinyl cutting than the current crop of sign packages and with many added benefits.
<<
User avatar

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 14363

Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 2:36 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:05 pm

Darren,
illustrator may be cheaper. Price wise, I think signlab as a cut only program, will have far more usable features than illustrator, but then you need a rip, so combination price is a factor, if, like you say a print requirement is needed, for most signage, then signlab has a rip included, and not a bad one either. For vectors only, signlab is far superior to illustrator, (for cuting anyway, with easier editing, welding and bleeding etc.)
One thing about signlabs rip, it is designed to print from signlab, and I have never had any of the shading/fading problems that are often spoken about on here, when printing files from other graphic programs, it does give good results , but then at the end of the day it is down to what you feel best with.


Peter
Last edited by Peter Normington on Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:05 pm

Re: Sign software

Karl Williams wrote:Mr. Richards,
Both Signlab and Easysign are cracking programmes.










mod-edit


Fair enough Karl but having used Signlab & the like, I'll be sticking with Illustrator as I just can't see any good reason to go back now.

Cheers
<<

Robert Lambie

User avatar

*****
*****

Posts: 27266

Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2001 1:00 am

Country: United Kingdom (uk)




Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:05 pm

after moving from spandex machines...

we now have 5 computers running signlab on a daily basis and have been about 11 years now i think... they run our vinyl cutters and do all design work for signage.

we have 2 computers running photoshop for print work design.

other than our rip software and router/engraving software... i have no use for any other sign/design software.
however, From signlab alone, i believe i can do it all, if need be, from the one software. that includes the designing, printing, cnc routering and engraving work.
Signlab is extremely user friendly and a very powerful software.

signlab can be bought for about £150 entry level, it is when you begin adding more and more modules to it that the price increases. having modules like this allows you to basically bolt-on what you need, leave out what you don't.

so in reply to you Wojciec... i would say Signlab wins hands down mate...
if you are unsure, i think you can download a demo copy of the software from cadlinks site, if not contact a signlab agent and i am sure they will send you the demo on dvd to give a go before purchase.


i have tried illustrator and flexisign... i did not like either.


.
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:21 pm

Peter Normington wrote:Darren,
illustrator may be cheaper, but then you need a rip, so combination price is a factor, if, like you say a print requirement is needed, for most signage, then signlab has a rip included, and not a bad one either. For vectors only, signlab is far superior to illustrator, (for cuting anyway, with easier editing, welding and bleeding etc.)
One thing about signlabs rip, it is designed to print from signlab, and I have never had any of the shading/fading problems that are often spoken about on here, when printing files from other graphic programs, it does give good results , but then at the end of the day it is down to what you feel best with.

Peter


Hi Peter,

You do indeed need a rip if you intend to print but most printers seem to be sold with a RIP and PC all pro RIP's will process the usual file formats, eps, jpg, tif, pdf.

However if you just want to cut vinyl then the cutting master software works perfectly with Illustrator (on specified plotters). I believe its a free download but I can't be sure about that.

I don't agree that Signlab is superior to Illustrator for vector cutting, editing, welding and bleeding. Once you have got to grips with it I have to say that I consider Illustrator to be superior...sorry can't say any more than that really.

I Agree though that it really doesn't matter what you use, as long as your happy you can achieve the desired result then who cares!
<<
User avatar

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 14363

Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 2:36 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:39 pm

Yes darren. you can also drag and drop the usual files onto signlab's rip.
Most rips supplied with printers are pretty basic, price up a production rip, and you will see what I mean.

the printer will include the cost of the rip, so if you dont want it, then the printer will be cheaper, nowt is for nowt if you see what I mean.

I prefer signlab, because it can do things easier for ME. I dont come from an illustrator background, although I have cs3, and finecut, (mimaki plug in) I find it far to complicated to do simple things, again its just my opinion, and for what its worth, signlab is far more user friendly for most signage design.

Peter
<<

Phill Fenton

User avatar

Premium Member
Premium Member

Posts: 11084

Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2002 11:04 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:39 pm

If I was starting a new sign business now I would probably use either Corel or Illustrator.

I use Casmate (an obsolete program no longer supported - but dongle protected) I also have Signlab 5 and signlab 7 - again both dongle protected. I also use Corel draw 9 which is not dongle protected.

In terms of proficiency Casmate is my main design and cutting program - simply because it's the first vector drawing package I learned and does everything I want. I later bought signlab 5 (it was on offer as a cross upgrade) because casmate was no longer supported and signlab had a casmate import feature (i.e it could import all my existing cutsomer casmate files). Later still I upgraded to signlab 7 when I bought a Cadet printer.

Nowadays I still do most vector design using casmate - and I use Corel for my print design software. Signlab is rarely used but has excellent weld features which allows me to produce cutting files from some god awful illustrator files that I occassionaly get sent.
My main concern with Casmate and Signlab is the dongle protection. Casmate is no longer supported and consequently if the dongle fails I'm up (oh i swore !) creek withgout a paddle :-? Likewise, If my signlab dongles fail I am left with unnecessary downtime and cost waiting for a replacement.

For that reason - if I'm being honest and was asked for a recomendation - I would reccomend Corel or Illustrator as first choice for a new start sign business.

I think you become fully proficient using whatever software you first learn.
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:40 pm

Robert Lambie wrote:after moving from spandex machines...

we now have 5 computers running signlab on a daily basis and have been about 11 years now i think... they run our vinyl cutters and do all design work for signage.

we have 2 computers running photoshop for print work design.

other than our rip software and router/engraving software... i have no use for any other sign/design software.
however, From signlab alone, i believe i can do it all, if need be, from the one software. that includes the designing, printing, cnc routering and engraving work.
Signlab is extremely user friendly and a very powerful software.

signlab can be bought for about £150 entry level, it is when you begin adding more and more modules to it that the price increases. having modules like this allows you to basically bolt-on what you need, leave out what you don't.

so in reply to you Wojciec... i would say Signlab wins hands down mate...
if you are unsure, i think you can download a demo copy of the software from cadlinks site, if not contact a signlab agent and i am sure they will send you the demo on dvd to give a go before purchase.


i have tried illustrator and flexisign... i did not like either.


.


Hi Rob,

I have the same confidence in Illustrator as you have in Signlab so I guess its just a personal preference at the end of the day.

I respect your opinion as much as everybody elses on this forum but I also stand by mine at this point

Sorry for not listing my equipment! :D
<<

Robert Lambie

User avatar

*****
*****

Posts: 27266

Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2001 1:00 am

Country: United Kingdom (uk)




Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:51 pm

I am not trying to convince anyone i am correct, my reply was my view and opinion. it was aimed at the original poster to take what he wished from it.


i did not realise i asked you to list your kit Darren.
<<

Darren Richards

User avatar

1 Star Contributor

Posts: 11

Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:10 pm





Post Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:58 pm

Peter Normington wrote:Yes darren. you can also drag and drop the usual files onto signlab's rip.
Most rips supplied with printers are pretty basic, price up a production rip, and you will see what I mean.

the printer will include the cost of the rip, so if you dont want it, then the printer will be cheaper, nowt is for nowt if you see what I mean.

I prefer signlab, because it can do things easier for ME. I dont come from an illustrator background, although I have cs3, and finecut, (mimaki plug in) I find it far to complicated to do simple things, again its just my opinion, and for what its worth, signlab is far more user friendly for most signage design.

Peter


Peter most RIP's support drag and drop and hotfolders but I agree that a pro RIP like Onyx is not cheap but it is essential for high volume consistent print production. But that's a different thread I think:)
<<

Chris Wool

User avatar

L-Gold Member
L-Gold Member

Posts: 7017

Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 4:02 pm





Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: SignLab vs. EasySign

Wojciech.Szul wrote:I'm considering buying SL
Can anyone compare SignLab with EasySign ?

I'm still owner of EasySign which I'm bouth years ago, but world goes forward.
My main direction is a logo designs & cutting complicated vecotr graphics with many Bezier curves. I'm using for that older version of Corel Draw - and this is my main designer tool - and I have big load of archives in cdr and eps format.

Any suggestions, opinions?


anyway i think you answered this your self upgrade your corel draw and carry on making money not waisting it learning new software.
you will love x3/4

chris
<<
User avatar

5 Star Contributor

Posts: 14363

Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 2:36 pm





Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:14 am

Darren Richards wrote:
Peter Normington wrote:Yes darren. you can also drag and drop the usual files onto signlab's rip.
Most rips supplied with printers are pretty basic, price up a production rip, and you will see what I mean.

the printer will include the cost of the rip, so if you dont want it, then the printer will be cheaper, nowt is for nowt if you see what I mean.

I prefer signlab, because it can do things easier for ME. I dont come from an illustrator background, although I have cs3, and finecut, (mimaki plug in) I find it far to complicated to do simple things, again its just my opinion, and for what its worth, signlab is far more user friendly for most signage design.

Peter


Peter most RIP's support drag and drop and hotfolders but I agree that a pro RIP like Onyx is not cheap but it is essential for high volume consistent print production. But that's a different thread I think:)




Well no Darren, its not another thread, you were the one comparing the price of signlab to illustrator, I was pointing out that illustrator cannot print straight to a large format printer, without a rip, so we must compare like for like, so for a cut only package, and a print and cut package, the total cost must be taken into consideration to compare the two.


Peter
<<

Warren Beard

User avatar

Premium Member
Premium Member

Posts: 5733

Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2006 12:43 am





Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:51 am

Phill wrote:I think you become fully proficient using whatever software you first learn.


That sums it up, I used to use Macromedia Freehand but when getting in to signage I had to get software and opted for Illustrator CS3, for the first week I wanted to cry because I couldn't get anything done and could do the same thing in Freehand in seconds, I persevered and now love Illustrator but really had to give it a full go.

If you want to avoid hassles of learning something new then stick to what you know and are comfortable with, but it is possible to change but must accept there will be a learning curve which will more than likely be very frustrating :roll:

I've never tried any other softwares but believe Illustrator is an all round package and fits in well with Photoshop etc.

Peter, I can run my large format printer directly from Illustrator, it is limited and awkward due to page layouts and profiles etc but is possible. I did it for a short while but the dedicated rip is much easier and quicker to use.

cheers

Warren
<<

Alan Drury

User avatar

L-Gold Member
L-Gold Member

Posts: 2147

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2004 6:29 pm





Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 2:08 pm

I use both Easysign and Signlab, my preference is Signlab and as for Illustrator - having tried it I took it off my system because Corel Draw X3/X4 offer virtually every tool you'll need and is significantly better value for money than Illustrator. I often get files from my printer because although originated in Illustrator they are so badly set up I have to alter them (in Corel) which are then sent back as pdf where they are ripped (on an Adobe RIP) Blame the user if you like but it happens so often.
Alan D

Return to General Software Topics



 

About
Contact
Board Rules
Membership
Terms & Conditions

 

Signapp - iPhone & iPad
Signapp - Android
Vehicle Wrap Training
Vinyl Application Training
Vehicle Wrap Accreditation
UK Sign Group
Site Membership
Advertising
Videos
British Signs & Graphics Assoc.

 

 Facebook
 Twitter
 Youtube
 Linkedin

 

Who is Online

In total there are 54 users online ::
5 registered, 0 hidden and 49 guests
[based on past 5 minutes]

Most users ever online was
370 on Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:02 pm

Registered users:
Chris Wilson, Mark Piddington, Simon Worrall

Copyright © 2000 - 2019 Robert Lambie